Rachael Bletchly’s Bird Brained Geisha Facial Review In The Daily Mirror

Rachael Bletchly's Bird Brained Geisha Facial Review In The Daily Mirror

A writer for the The Daily Mirror, a UK publication, recently wrote a review about a facial performed by a spa in London, England that’s strikingly similar to Shizuka new york’s Geisha Facial® .

While other spas around the world may imitate The Geisha Facial®, the original was born right here in New York City by Shizuka Bernstein and her husband, the dermatologist, Dr. Robert M. Bernstein. We still think it’s worth responding to her review. Everyone’s entitled to an opinion, right?!

While some may believe the facial is effective but not worth the price point, we beg to differ. The years of research Shizuka and her husband put into the treatment process ensures it’s “scientifically correct” and effective for balancing out skin tone, deepening hydration, and to ensure it’s facial-worthy, it’s a highly relaxing and calming experience.

As a master aesthetician herself, Shizuka ensures that every Geisha Facial® is performed with techniques that fit her standard of care and precision for each and every client. “I want to bring Japanese beauty secrets to all my clients so that their skin may benefit from all-natural Japanese ingredients without having to  leave the city. I’m not happy until my clients are satisfied with the results”, says Shizuka.

Every Geisha Facial® incorporates all-natural ingredients sourced directly from Japan like green tea, sake, and Mount Fuji water. With the help of Shizuka new york’s highly trained facialists, you’ll be transported to Japan and back in little under an hour!

 

Learn more about Shizuka Bernstein’s The Geisha Facial®

Make an appointment to experience the original facial for yourself!

 

Does Botox Help Depression? The Latest Research Findings

Does Botox help depression? The latest research has found that Botox does help depression — but not directly.  Rather Botox reduces the symptoms of depression by paralyzing certain facial muscles.

The idea that facial expressions might affect those areas of the brain responsible for emotion, is not new. It goes back to Charles Darwin, who observed:  “The free expression by outward signs of an emotion intensifies it.”  Research today continues to support this idea.

For example, researchers have discovered that people who were asked to frown during a physically painful situation felt more pain than people who were asked to smile.  These results suggest that we can reduce the experience of pain by changing our expression.

But physical pain runs along different neural pathways then emotional pain.  Can facial expressions affect emotions as well as physical sensations?

Current research suggests they can. University of Groningen psychologist Judith Grob asked subjects to look at disgusting images. Half the subjects were prevented from expressing disgust by holding a pen between their teeth while viewing images. This kept them from frowning. The other half, however, could respond normally.  The subjects who could not frown reported feeling less disgust than those who could — but this came at a cost. While they reported feeling less disgust, they also showed symptoms of emotional repression. That is, they performed worse on a memory test and they tended to view ambiguous situations more negatively.  This suggests that at some level they were experiencing disgust, but that experience failed to reach the level of conscious awareness.

Botox, like holding a pen between one’s teeth, also prevents the activation of one’s frown muscles. But this raises an interesting question:  does Botox alleviate depression or are the negative emotions merely suppressed?

Currently, no one knows.

The world always looks brighter from behind a smile. -  Unknown

This latest study found that Botox helped those diagnosed with a major depressive disorder, but does this mean you should get Botox if you’re this depressed? Absolutely not.

First, having major depression is one of the highest risk factors for suicide. If you’re experiencing a major depressive episode, you need to seek out expert medical help, not a Botox injection.

Second, if you have a non-major form of depression, it may be far better to work through it. Many professionals think that non-major forms of depression are a evolutionary adaptations designed to help us solve complex personal and interpersonal problems.  These individuals, some scientists argue, are better off working through their emotions and problems, as long as the depression isn’t  life threatening.

Finally, abundant research has found that choosing to see the bright side of things, choosing to really smile, can truly make one feel happier.

But, feeling happier won’t erase one’s fine lines and wrinkles — for that, you will need Botox.

Shizuka new York Day Spa Botox Treatment

Shizuka New York Botox injections are performed by Dr. Olivia Hutchinson, one of Manhattan’s leading plastic surgeons, in our tranquil and non-clinical spa. Botox treatments take as little as 5 minutes to perform, they are effective in smoothing wrinkles between the eyebrows, on the forehead and in reducing fine lines under the eyes, and the effects of treatment last 4-6 months.

Experience what Shizuka New York Botox treatment can do for you by scheduling a consultation with our doctors by phone at (212) 644-7400 or book an appointment online today.

References

  1. Treatment of depression with onabotulinumtoxinA: A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial, Journal of Psychiatric Research Volume 52, Pages 1–6, May 2014
  2. Study: For a better workday, smile like you mean it, Brent Scott, Michigan State University, 22-Feb-2011
  3. Keep smiling: Enduring effects of facial expressions and postures on emotional experience and memory, Cognition and Emotion, 2003, 17 (5), 787-797
  4. Depression’s Evolutionary Roots, Paul W. Andrews and J. Anderson Thomson Jr., Scientific America, Aug 25, 2009
  5. Emotion regulation: Affective, cognitive, and social consequences, James J. Gross, Psychophysiology, 39 (2002), 281–291.

 

How to get your Vitamin D Levels Up While Protecting your Skin

How to get your Vitamin D Levels Up While Protecting your Skin

Vitamin D, also known as the “sunshine vitamin,” does more for your body than you think: it influences nearly 3,000 different genes in your body. Receptors that respond to the vitamin have been found in almost every type of cell, from the brain to the heart to the bones. The skin also benefits tremendously from Vitamin D. Having a sufficient amount helps minimize acne, boost elasticity, stimulate collagen production, enhance radiance, and lessen the appearance of lines and dark spots. The Institute of Medicine of the National Academies’ Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin D is 600 IU (International Units) a day for people between the ages of 1 and 70. This amount can be easily acquired through sun exposure, the most natural method, certain foods, and supplements. While vitamin D is most easily and naturally acquired through sun exposure, waiving skin protection can come with a price. New York City dermatologist Dr. Robert M. Bernstein of Bernstein Medical advises, “Going into the sun without proper protection can have dangerous adverse reactions to the skin over time like sun spots and skin cancer. It’s better to wear sunscreen and protect your skin at all times.”

The Sunscreen Factor

Proponents of getting vitamin D through sun absorption, like The Vitamin D Council, suggest exposing yourself to the sun for 10 to 15 minutes before applying sunscreen.  The Vitamin D Council touts: “The most natural way to get vitamin D is by exposing your bare skin to sunlight (ultraviolet B rays). This can happen very quickly, particularly in the summer. You don’t need to tan or burn your skin to get vitamin D. You only need to expose your skin for around half the time it takes for your skin to turn pink and begin to burn. How much vitamin D is produced from sunlight depends on the time of day, where you live in the world and the color of your skin. The more skin you expose the more vitamin D is produced.”

The problem with exposing bare skin to sunlight before sunscreen is that any amount of time in the sun without proper protection greatly increases the risk of skin cancer and causes the skin to age prematurely.

 

Sunlight Effects Aging Skin

In addition to an increased risk of skin cancer, sun exposure also greatly ages the skin and can cause DNA damage. The sun’s UV rays can greatly effect the skin’s appearance by causing premature aging. Examples of this include wrinkles, hyperpigmentation like sun spots, sagging, fine lines, and leathering.  Fortunately, we don’t have to fry our skin to get vitamin D, there are others ways to make sure we get our daily dose of the “sunshine vitamin”.

 

Vitamin D Foods

While the amount of vitamin D present in these foods isn’t enough to achieve the daily recommended dose, any little bit can certainly help. Vitamin D foods are:

 Fatty fish (ex: salmon)

 Beef liver

 Egg yolks

 Fortified milk and orange juice

 Fortified cereals

 Infant formula

 

Vitamin D Daily Supplements

There are two kinds of vitamin D supplements on the market today: D2 and D3. D3 is the closest to the what the body produces from sunlight. It’s converted into its active form much faster than D2 and is available in more potent dosages.

Dermatologists emphasize the most effective alternative to sun exposure and vitamin D-fortified foods are daily supplements. Dr. Bernstein concurs: “The easiest and most risk-free way of getting your vitamin D levels up is to take supplements.”

 

 

 

 

Nail Salon LED Lamps May Be Safer for Skin

A recent news clip on NBC’s Today Show reported that a new study shows that UV lamps in nail salons may increase cancer risks. These dryers emit UVA light to cure or harden gel “polishes” in a fraction of the time it takes to dry regular polish.

Dr. Lyndsay Shipp, who lead the study said: “Even with numerous exposures, the risk for carcinogenesis remains small.”

Even so, Shizuka new york Day Spa’s owner, Shizuka Bernstein, wanted to avoid this risk altogether and opted instead for a LED-based gel manicure and pedicure system for her New York City nail salon.

“Our LED system uses LED lamps instead of UV lamps to cure gel nails. Our clients like our LED gel nails because it takes even less time to cure nails than UV gels (30 seconds versus 2 minutes) and feels safer,” says Ms. Bernstein.

Learn more about Shizuka new york’s LED Gel Nails here >>

 

 

Source: The New York Times Nail Salon Lamps May Increase Skin Cancer Risk

The Geisha Facial® mentioned in The Times of India

Times of India Logo edited

The Times of India included Shizuka new york Day Spa’s The Geisha Facial® in its list of bizarre facials that deliver ‘diva-approved’ results!

Celebrity fans of the facial are Tom Cruise and Victoria and David Beckham.

 

Here’s what The Times of India had to say:

 

Glow with bird poop
If there is something other, that Tom Cruise is known to advocate for after Scientology, it’s the bird poop facial. Not one for the botox and surgeries, rubbing a concoction of nightingale poop, rice bran and water gives his face the shine that he is looking for. The nightingale poop facial, also known as the Geisha facial as it originates from Japan, is known to exfoliate the dirt from the skin and leave it shining and squeaky clean. Guess who introduced him to the ways of the nightingale? Good friend David Beckham. He and his wife, Posh are known to be high on the treatment too.

 

 

Related blog posts:

Holiday Gift Ideas from Shizuka New York and The Associated Press
 
Shamenet Magazine names The Geisha Facial® as one of the Most Unique Spa Treatments in the World!

Shizuka’s BeautyZen Corner: Geisha Beauty Secrets

U.S. Spa Market Analysis claims The Geisha Facial® is Trending

 

 

Have you tried The Geisha Facial® yet?

 

 

 

 

 



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